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war on drugs

There is a theory that the War on Drugs has morphed into a new strategy: Legalization or Regulations. The main idea in this theory is that the strategy was to legalize cannabis, create all kinds of social equity programs that go nowhere, and then apply such difficult application processes, extremely high fees, legal and operational costs that only big money can possibly afford to open licensed cultivation, manufacture, distribution, or dispensary operations. Part of the 
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You probably thought the War on Drugs had ended with cannabis legalization. It didn’t. As a socio-political tool to manage the accumulation of power, it is still alive and active. The identification of certain social groups with certain drugs has long been a way of legally controlling the political power of those ethnic and civic groups. Anti-opium laws were directed at the Chinese. Anti-marijuana laws in the Southwest were directed at Mexican laborers and immigrants. 
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Speculation is growing about the possibility that the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) will review by summer its “Schedule I” designation of marijuana as equal to heroin among the world’s most dangerous drugs. Very few Americans know of or understand the DEA’s drug-ranking process, and a review of cannabis’s history as a Schedule I drug shows that the label is highly controversial and dubious. Disgraced Attorney General John Mitchell of the Nixon administration placed marijuana 
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Washington (CNN)One of Richard Nixon’s top advisers and a key figure in the Watergate scandal said the war on drugs was created as a political tool to fight blacks and hippies, according to a 22-year-old interview recently published in Harper’s Magazine.   “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people,” former Nixon domestic policy chief John Ehrlichman told Harper’s writer Dan Baum 
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